PTSD Awareness Month

What is PTSD?

PTSD stands for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and is caused by experiencing or witnessing some traumatic event such as accidents (car, boat, falling from great heights, etc), abuse of any kind, assault of any kind, any life-threatening experience, unexpected and severe injury or death of a loved one, and war.

Signs and Symptoms

Common signs and symptoms of PTSD are agitation, irritability, hypervigilance, social isolation, mentally reliving the traumatic experience, flashbacks, nightmares, panic attacks, severe anxiety, fear mistrust, guilt, shame, and avoidance of things that are reminders of the trauma.

For those who have PTSD, it can be a scary and lonely road. They often feel fear, anxiety, have panic attacks, nightmares, or have trouble sleeping.

Those who have experienced a traumatic event and have PTSD may be distrusting of others or have a fear of social situations that make them feel vulnerable and unsafe. They may be easily triggered by events, people, certain topics, noises, etc.

treatment options

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT):
    • Medical News Today defines CBT as, “A short-term therapy technique that can help people find new ways to behave by changing their thought patterns. Engaging with CBT can help people reduce stress, cope with complicated relationships, deal with grief, and face many other common life challenges.”
  2. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR):
    • EMDR is a nontraditional method of treating PTSD and trauma. Instead of talk therapy, it helps alleviate the distress that is associated with traumatic memories and form more positive associations with those memories.
    • The therapist will have the client begin by focusing on an external stimulus. The most common is to move their fingers from left to right in front of the client’s face and have the client follow along with their eyes. Other alternatives are toe-tapping, finger-tapping, or audio tones. The therapist will prompt the client to think of the stressful event while continuing the eye movement.
    • Gradually the therapist will prompt the client to shift their thoughts to more pleasant ones. This helps diminish the intense negative feelings associated with the event.
  3. Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PET):
    • Psychology Today says, ” The goal of PET is to gradually help you reengage with life, especially with things you have been avoiding. By doing so, you will strengthen your ability to distinguish safety from danger and decrease your PTSD symptoms. ”
  4. Medications:

how to help a loved one with ptsd

Living with someone with PTSD can be tricky especially if the trauma was recent. They may be distant, less affectionate, be skittish, fearful, or just act differently from how they used to act.

Some ways you can help your loved one is:

1- Be patient. Your loved one is processing a lot of emotions that are hard for them to handle. They might be experiencing intense stress, fear, and anxiety. Your patience and understanding can be a rock for them through their hard times.

2- Manage your own stress: Make sure that you are taking care of yourself and managing your own stress first. If you are not taking care of your own needs you will not be fully prepared to help your loved on in their time of need.

3- Accept and expect mixed emotions/ feelings. As your loved one is going through the healing process and hopefully getting help, it is inevitable that they will be up and down a lot. They might be triggered easily and have a panic attack. Their mood may change abruptly. Be prepared for this so that when it happens you will not take it personally and better handle the situation.

4- Don’t pressure your loved one into talking. We all have our own timeline and needs when it comes to processing emotions and healing. Let your loved one know you are there for them but do not pressure them into talking about the traumatic event. Give them time and space.

Additional resources

PTSD can be a scary for those who suffer with it. If you have PTSD, know you do not have to do it on your own. Find professional help and a support group if that would help you. aid Psychology Today is a great resource for finding a therapist in your area.

If you know someone who has PTSD, become more educated on PTSD and learn how to be an advocate for your loved ones and aid them in the healing process.

Here are some additional resources.

https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-Conditions/Posttraumatic-Stress-Disorder/Support

http://www.ptsdalliance.org/resources/

https://www.everydayhealth.com/ptsd/guide/resources/

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