Depression– The Basics

While everyone will experience high points and low points in their lifetime, the degree to which everyone experiences their highs and lows varies greatly.

For those who experience more extreme low points, it can be hard to know if or when you should seek help. In this post, we will discuss the symptoms of depression and where you can find help to better manage your low points in life.

There is a difference between feeling depressed and struggling with depression.

Feelings of depression are fleeting and don’t last longer than a day or two. Depression lasts for days, weeks, or other long periods of time and usually is accompanied by changes in weight, sleep, appetite, and mood.

Dealing With Depression: Symptoms

Depression Symptoms: Mood/ Cognitive
  • A feeling of hopelessness, helpless,
  • Mood swings
  • Intense sadness or feeling “empty”
  • Anxiety
  • Apathy
  • Loss of interest
  • Loss of pleasure
  • Irritability
  • Restlessness
  • Thoughts of suicide
  • Repetitive thoughts
  • Lack of concentration
  • A bleak outlook on life
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
  • Self-criticism
Depression Symptoms: Behavioral
  • Isolation
Depression Symptoms: Physical
  • Weight gain
  • Emotional eating
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Excessive sleepiness
  • Restless sleep
  • insomnia
  • Headaches/migraines
  • Unexplainable aches and pains
  • Frequent upset stomach
Suicide Signs and symptoms

Suicide and suicidal thoughts are not only associated with depression but can be linked to other mental disorders. If you have any of the following symptoms, you may be at higher risk for suicide.

  • Hopelessness 
  • Excessive sadness
  • Excessive moodiness
  • Sleep problems
  • Sudden calmness
  • Withdrawal

“Choosing to be alone and avoiding friends or social activities also are possible symptoms of depression, a leading cause of suicide. This includes the loss of interest or pleasure in activities the person previously enjoyed.”

WebMD
  • Changes in personality and/or appearance

“A person who is considering suicide might exhibit a change in attitude or behavior, such as speaking or moving with unusual speed or slowness. In addition, the person might suddenly become less concerned about his or her personal appearance.”

WebMD
  • Dangerous or self-harmful behavior
  • Recent trauma or life crisis
  • Threatening Suicide
  • Making preparations

“Often, a person considering suicide will begin to put his or her personal business in order. This might include visiting friends and family members, giving away personal possessions, making a will, and cleaning up his or her room or home. Some people will write a note before committing suicide. Some will buy a firearm or other means like poison.”

WebMD

Finding a therapist

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms above, a therapist will be able to help you and can give you more resources or tools for recovery.

Are you nervous about going to see a therapist? Don’t worry, you still have options.

If dealing with depression is making it hard for you to get out of bed, you can talk to a therapist in your pajamas, from the comfort of your own home.

Today’s technologically enhanced world allows you the opportunity to talk with a licensed therapist through phone calls, online chats, or mobile apps. Such options include Talk Space, Better Help, Regain, Teen Counseling, and Break Through.

You can also set up a Skype or regular phone call with a therapist who does telehealth appointments. By visiting Psychology Today you can search for providers in your area. Once you put in your geographic area, on the left-hand side there is an option to search for providers who offer online services.

Living life with depression is hard enough. Don’t try to tackle it all on your own.

The National Network of Depression Centers also keeps a list of online resources that could be helpful.

To get more understanding about dealing with depression, watch this video called, “I had a blag dog, his name was depression” from the World Health Organization.

If you’re looking for more ways to help you deal with depression, the National Institute of Mental Health also gives great explanations about medication and other therapies that can be helpful for someone dealing with depression.

Brain Awareness Month– Neurofeedback

In honor of Brain Awareness Month we will be spotlighting neurofeedback in this post. Never heard of neurofeedback? Curious how it can help you? You’re not alone. Every month thousands of people look up neurofeedback in search engines. Why? Because it’s a non-invasive, non-medication therapy that works wonders for the brain.

 

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The Brain

The brain has the ability to change itself due to its capability to undergo neurogenesis and neuroplasticity.  Neurogenesis is the ability to grow and develop new neurons in the brain while neuroplasticity is the ability to change and restructure the neurological pathways in the brain. Neurofeedback encourages the processes of neurogenesis and neuroplasticity.

In a typical neurofeedback therapy session, a neurofeedback technician places electrodes on a client’s head, and then a software program creates a reward system for the brain as the client watches a movie of their choosing.  The program trains the brain to self-regulate its brain waves which in turn helps the client learn to manage their emotions, thoughts, and performance.

 

 

Jessica Harper, the owner of Aspen Valley Counseling, used to get in her car and know she was going to miss the entrance of wherever she was going. Without fail, a chorus of groans sounded off in the back seat of her silver VW bug as her children cried, “Not again!” But after doing neurofeedback therapy she no longer misses her entrances. “It’s pretty amazing that neurofeedback—something so simple in practice—has helped me in such a day-to-day thing.”

There are countless others who have also experienced great results with neurofeedback. Many have had help with their anxiety, their depression, learned to have better focus, and much more!

Basics of Neurofeedback Therapy

Neurofeedback therapy helps with a myriad of mental health related issues that deal with the brain. It can help:

 

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  • ADD/ADHD
  • Trauma
  • PTSD
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Addiction
  • Brain Injury
  • Autism
  • Stress
  • Insomnia
  • Phobias
  • Performance (such as for sports or testing for school)
  • Energy Levels
  • Meditation

It’s non-invasive and doesn’t involve any medication. So if you’re looking for an alternative to medication, neurofeedback therapy could be something you might want to try.

It may seem too good to be true, but it works wonders for people! For effective treatment, a patient should attend at least 20 sessions (and at least two sessions per week) for long-term results. A patient can finish them faster by doing two sessions per day, five times per week.

If you’re on medication, you can still do neurofeedback therapy. With supervision by your doctor or provider, some people can even cut down or stop using medication after completing neurofeedback therapy.

Cost of Neurofeedback Therapy

Most insurance companies do not cover neurofeedback, since they see it as an unnecessary treatment. Western medicine is typically medication-based, so an insurance company is much more likely to cover costs of medication. But if you don’t want to take medication to improve your mental health, and you’re seeking out alternative medicine, you’re probably going to be paying out-of-pocket anyway.

Neurofeedback is a great option for someone looking to treat their mental health. Most neurofeedback sessions cost around $75 to $100 per session plus an extra cost for the first appointment. If you’re looking for a cheaper option and you happen to live in Utah, Aspen Valley Counseling in Orem, Utah (Utah County) charges clients $50 per session.