Can Neurofeedback Help With ADHD?, neurofeedback therapy, ADHD, medication, alternative treatment, aspen valley counseling, orem, UT therapy

Can Neurofeedback Help With ADHD?

The short answer? Yes. Neurofeedback can help with ADHD.

Neurofeedback has been shown to improve impulsivity, inattention, and hyperactivity, which are symptoms associated with neurofeedback.

Neurofeedback is an alternative to ADHD medicine

If you don’t want to put your child on ADHD medication, or your child doesn’t want to take ADHD medicine anymore, you’re probably wondering what your options are. On the one hand, ADHD medications are extremely helpful for your child, but maybe your child just doesn’t like how they make them feel. One option you could try is neurofeedback.

Working with your child’s pediatrician or psychiatrist is essential in making sure this process happens smoothly. They will know how to best help your child transition off or lower the dosage of the medication. Consult with your physician before making changes in your child’s medication use.

Some people find that neurofeedback helps them reduce their ADHD medication but not fully go off their meds.

The effects of neurofeedback on ADHD is long-lasting

The great thing about neurofeedback is the effects are long-lasting. In a study conducted by Vincent Monastra, founder of the FPI Attention Disorders Clinic, he found that children who received neurofeedback along with their medication were able to lower their ADHD medication doses by 50 percent.

So while the treatment will take time to complete (you need to do at least 20 to 30 sessions for it to be long-lasting effects), it can be worth it for the long-lasting effects.

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What does neurofeedback do?

Neurofeedback trains your brain to help you have better attention, focus, sleep, and emotional regulation, among other things. Basically, your brain emits many types of waves, and you want them to perform in a certain way that will help you stay focused. Neurofeedback fixes things up so that you have the right amount of brainwaves in the right areas of your brain.

For people with ADHD, neurofeedback will help their brain produce the right brainwaves to help them focus better. After undergoing neurofeedback, people with ADHD can notice they’re less impulsive, distracted, and act out less.

If you want to know more about the brainwave science behind neurofeedback, check out CHADD‘s (Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) website.

What’s involved in neurofeedback?

Neurofeedback sessions take about 30 to 45 minutes each session and are usually pretty pricey. According to ADDitude magazine, most practitioners charge $2,000 to $5,000 dollars for the treatment; however, at Aspen Valley Counseling, prices are lower to make the service available for more people. At Aspen Valley Counseling, you will only pay around $1000 for your neurofeedback treatment with an option to add on a qEEG brain mapping (that will show where to pinpoint the areas of your brain in neurofeedback training) for only $550 (usually around $750).

When you or your child go to complete your neurofeedback treatment, the therapist or neurofeedback tech will put the electrodes on your skull, pinpointing areas where your brain needs training. Then you’ll either play a game or watch a movie or image. If you’re “playing” a game, you’ll be watching a screen that will reflect what’s going on with your brainwaves. If your brainwaves are moving toward behaving how you’re supposed to, you’ll do well in the game, but if they’re not, you won’t do as well in the game. This kind of feedback teaches your brain what types of brainwaves to produce.

Neurofeedback alters brainwave activity that impacts symptoms related to ADHD.

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Are there any downsides to neurofeedback?

Just like any therapy, there’s no guarantee that it will work for you if you have ADHD. Some people go completely off medication and opt to just use neurofeedback; others use a combination of ADHD medication and neurofeedback. Each case is very individual, and individuals should work closely with healthcare professionals when weighing the options.

There are many studies that support neurofeedback as a treatment for ADHD, but there are also some that don’t support it.

And the most annoying downside is that it’s also not covered by most insurance companies. But, for that reason Aspen Valley Counseling is committed to low prices for neurofeedback.

If you have any questions about neurofeedback pricing or payment plans, you can email Aspen Valley Counseling at aspenvalleycounseling@gmail.com or call the office at (801) 224-1103.

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ADHD in Children: How to Help

Raising kids is hard enough as it is since each child comes with their own unique challenges. When you find out your child has ADHD, you can’t expect the same types of behavior from them as you would children without ADHD. Here’s what you need to know if your child is diagnosed with ADHD.

What is it?

ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is a condition caused by problems related to the structure and wiring of the brain and can affect one’s ability to focus, sit still, and make appropriate decisions. We still aren’t sure exactly how ADHD is developed, but we know it can be linked to family history as well as brain injury. It is usually diagnosed in childhood but can often continue into adulthood.

What does ADHD look like in children?

Psychologists have categorized ADHD into three groups or “types” based on their symptoms: inattentive type, hyperactive/impulsive type, or combined type.

If your child has been showing six to nine of ADHD symptoms for the past 6 months, it is likely that they could have ADHD. It’s important to note that you as a parent might not see all these symptoms displayed in the home. Be sure to talk to your child’s teachers, parents of friends, and other adults who they interact with to get a better picture of how your child is behaving in various situations.

Here are the two types of ADHD and their corresponding symptoms:

Inattentive type:

  • Doesn’t pay close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in school or tasks
  • Has problems staying focused on tasks or activities
  • Doesn’t seem to listen when spoken to (seems to be elsewhere)
  • Doesn’t follow through on instructions and doesn’t complete schoolwork or chores
  • Has problems organizing tasks and work
  • Avoids or dislikes tasks that require sustained mental effort
  • Often misplaces important things
  • Is easily distracted
  • Forgets daily tasks, such as doing chores and running errands

Hyperactive/impulsive type:

  • Fidgets with or taps hands or feet, or squirms in seat
  • Unable to stay seated (in classroom, workplace)
  • Runs about or climbs where it is inappropriate
  • Unable to play or do leisure activities quietly
  • Always “on the go,” as if driven by a motor
  • Talks too much
  • Blurts out an answer before a question has been finished
  • Has difficulty waiting his or her turn, such as while waiting in line
  • Interrupts or intrudes on others

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How can I know for sure if my child has ADHD?

Many of the symptoms mentioned might sound like a normal part of growing up for young kids but can also be significantly impairing their day to day tasks. If your child is exhibiting an unusual amount of the symptoms mentioned above, talk to your child’s pediatrician or a therapist who specializes in ADHD. They can help set your child up with a treatment plan. If your child’s pediatrician is unfamiliar in diagnosing and treating ADHD, they may refer you to a child psychologist. Some mental health clinics may even offer ADHD screenings.

You can go to this website to look for psychologists in your area that can better help with diagnosis. You can even go to your child’s school counselor to seek help.

What treatment is available for ADHD?

An ongoing study from the National Institute of mental health has shown that the most effective treatment for ADHD in children is stimulant medication. This type of medication, is designed to help children in their interactions with others, reduce symptoms of hyperactivity, and help them focus more. Ritalin, Adderall, and Vyvanse are some of the common brands of stimulant medication. Talk to your child’s pediatrician or a psychiatrist about whether or not your child can benefit from this treatment.

Psychologists and counselors will not be able to prescribe medication for your child, but they can help your child with behavioral issues that come with ADHD. Studies have shown that a combination of medication and behavioral therapy can significantly improve symptoms, especially if your child is struggling with any other type of emotional disorders.

You should also look into neurofeedback as a non-medication option for ADHD. It has been shown to help kids with ADHD think more clearly.

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What can I do to help as a parent?

Catching and treating ADHD early is crucial to your child’s social and educational development. One of the most important things you can do is to praise them for their efforts and notice when they show good behavior. Reinforcing good behavior and appropriately addressing bad behavior will not only help their self-esteem but also help them learn right from wrong.

Additude Magazine has outlined 12 “Dos and Don’ts” for how to best help your child with ADHD. Some of them include punishment and positive reinforcement, avoiding blame, and modeling appropriate behavior.

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Neurofeedback Therapy: Treatment for ADHD, Anxiety, Traumatic Brain Injury, and More

If you’re curious about neurofeedback therapy and how it can help you, you’re not the only one. Every month thousands of people look it up in search engines. Why? Because it’s a non-invasive, non-medication therapy that works wonders.

Jessica Harper, the owner of Aspen Valley Counseling, used to get in her car and know she was going to miss the entrance of wherever she was going. Without fail, a chorus of groans sounded off in the back seat of her silver VW bug as her children cried, “Not again!” But after doing neurofeedback therapy, she hasn’t missed an entrance. “It’s pretty amazing that neurofeedback—something so simple in practice—has helped me in such a day-to-day thing.”

In a typical neurofeedback therapy session, a neurofeedback technician places electrodes on a client’s head, and then the computer program creates images on the screen that represent the client’s brain waves. The client will see their own brain activity and learn to change it, which helps them learn to manage their emotions, thoughts, and performance.

Basics of Neurofeedback Therapy

Neurofeedback therapy helps with a myriad of mental health–related issues that deal with the brain. It can help

  • ADD/ADHD
  • Trauma
  • Stress
  • Anxiety
  • Addiction
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Phobias
  • Performance (such as for sports)
  • Autism
  • Energy Levels
  • PTSD
  • Brain Injury
  • Meditation

It’s non-invasive and doesn’t involve any medication. So if you’re looking for an alternative to medication, neurofeedback therapy could be something you might want to try.

It may seem too good to be true, but it works wonders for people! For effective treatment, a patient should attend at least 20 sessions (and at least two sessions per week) for long-term results. A patient can finish them faster by doing two sessions per day, five times per week.

If you’re on medication, you can still do neurofeedback therapy. With supervision on your doctor or provider, some people can even cut down or stop using medication after completing neurofeedback therapy.

Cost of Neurofeedback Therapy

Most insurance companies do not cover neurofeedback, since they see it as an unnecessary treatment. Western medicine is typically medication-based, so an insurance company is much more likely to cover costs of medication. But if you don’t want to take medication to improve your mental health, and you’re seeking out alternative medicine, you’re probably going to be paying out of pocket anyway.

Neurofeedback is a great option for someone looking to treat their mental health. Most neurofeedback sessions cost around $75 to $100 per session plus an extra cost for the first appointment. If you’re looking for a cheaper option and you happen to live in Utah, Aspen Valley Counseling in Orem, Utah (Utah County) charges clients $50 per session.

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What is Neurofeedback?

Neurofeedback is a process of showing someone their brain activity in order to help the brain learn to change and become more efficient and effective. Neurofeedback uses EEG (electroencephalography) sensors attached to your head to produce an image on a computer screen. The visuals and sounds coming from the computer program will guide your brain and help you work toward your goals – whether that be better concentration, lower anxiety, or better memory.

Neurofeedback therapy will help you feel better, think better, and do things better. Neurofeedback will help you train or re-train your brain. And just like when you learned to ride a bike, they skills you learn from neurofeedback will stick with you.

What can neurofeedback help with?

–          ADD/ADHD

–          Depression

–          PTSD

–          Increase energy

–          Fears/phobias

–          Stress

–          Performance

–          Anxiety

–          Insomnia

–          Migraines

–          Addiction

–          Relationship

–          Trauma

–          Autism

–          Test anxiety

–          Brain injury

–          Cognitive issues

–          Hormonal and neurochemical issues

–          TBI, strokes

–          Focus and concentration

–          Feeling in the present

–          Stabilizing mood

–          Improving reactions to external world

–          Making you less defended

–          Helping you connect more emotionally

–          Increase peace and serenity

–          Help you have more objective observations

–          Help you access and integrate repressed experiences

–          Help you overcome distorted beliefs

–          Help you overcome insecurities

–          Help you overcome phobias